Lets Get Real #4 – “Another value of belonging” to the teacher’s union

Until the President of the Teacher’s Union mass emailed this to her teachers the email coming in to the School Board was running over 85% in support of a sale. After this email went out prompting some teachers to write to us the support for a sale went down to a still overwhelming 70%. This letter only prompted about 40 of ISD 709’s teachers to write in to oppose the sale. That’s out of perhaps 600 teachers or less than ten percent. Not very impressive. Perhaps the other teachers were wondering which of several dozen teachers were about to be laid off due to next year’s budget cuts.

I will leave this “talking points” as it was sent out in this post. In the next post I will pick it apart.

As has been evident in so many Presidential campaigns fear mongering has proven a useful political tool.

BTW – I am pleased Bernie told her members to read this during their off duty hours.

*************************************************************

From: Bernadette Burnham [DFT President]

To: Teachers Unit

Subject: Read during off duty hours~Fwd: for members and community – messaging about fiscal impact
If you have not yet written to the board, here are a few more talking points provided by our ED MN staff, sure appreciate all they have done for us the last couple days!

Another Value of Belonging

Begin forwarded message:

From: [EDUCATION MINNESOTA THE MINNESOTA STATE TEACHER’S UNION]
Subject: for members and community – messaging about fiscal impact
Date: March 30, 2016 at 4:45:09 PM CDT
To: [Bernadette Burnham]

Here are some new talking points for your members and community supporters:

• Edison charter school’s growth ambitions will cost Duluth’s public schools at least $4 million to $5 million by 2020. Competitive advantages gained by operating Edison’s high school at the Central site mean that future Duluth school board members could be grappling with a loss exceeding $7 million by 2020.

• If the district sells Central High to Tischer Creek, the $14.2 million in one-time money from the sale will be gone in eight to 10 years.

• Based on a conservative estimate projecting a loss of 700 students to the charter by 2021-22, Duluth school board members should prepare for larger class sizes, catastrophic cuts and additional school closings in those years.

• Fiscally, a better option would be to get one-time money from a non-competitor that will maintain permanent property tax income for the district.

• Enrollment losses will be a harsh reality for Duluth if the school board does not swiftly and boldly refocus its work on bringing parents, students, educators and the community together in the work of strengthening Duluth’s public schools.

• Let’s reject false choices and short-sighted promises and move toward uniting the community behind real and sustainable improvements, like creating more full-service community schools. The success of this model has shown that by working together, diverse stakeholders can reinvigorate Duluth’s schools from the bottom up. Through community engagement and participatory school improvement, Duluth can retain and attract new students and families for generations to come.

The reality: Money from Central sale will disappear within a decade
Edison charter school’s growth ambitions will cost Duluth’s public schools at least $4 million to $5 million by 2020. And if the district sells Central High to Tischer Creek, the $14.2 million in one-time money from the sale will be gone in eight to 10 years.
Based on a conservative estimate projecting a loss of 700 students to the charter by 2021-22, Duluth school board members should prepare for larger class sizes, catastrophic cuts and additional school closings in those years.
Using the Minnesota Department of Education’s interactive revenue projection model in their website’s data center, the math is simple and clear. The sale of the Central High School site to Tischer Creek will not pay off.
Edison charter school’s stated goal for new enrollment is 660 students. If they acquire Central, a cheaper and more centrally located site, the school will grow faster and have more flexibility to spend money on programs and services to compete with Duluth’s public schools. These advantages mean that future Duluth school board members could be grappling with a loss exceeding $7 million by 2020.
School board members should vote to maintain the current policy prohibiting the sale of the Central High site to a competitor. Fiscally, a better option would be to get one-time money from a non-competitor that will, at a minimum, maintain permanent property tax income for the district.
Children are not commodities. Competition in education is not equivalent to competition in the private sector. Charter school competition has accelerated public school closings around the state and the country, creating winners and losers.
Enrollment losses will be a harsh reality for Duluth if the school board does not swiftly and boldly refocus its work on bringing parents, students, educators and the community together in the work of strengthening Duluth’s public schools. Let’s reject false choices and short-sighted promises and move toward uniting the community behind real and sustainable improvements, like creating more full-service community schools. The success of this model has shown that by working together, diverse stakeholders can reinvigorate Duluth’s schools from the bottom up.