Category Archives: word search

Word search of the Day

Sleep

I did check this word prompted by the last post. I included the word, as I suspected, about 40 times in 2009 when my Red Plan battle was coming to a dreadful end. The year before it was not yet a serious issue. I think I was still finding time to swim four or five days a week in 2008.

I was surprised to see that in 2006 when I was running against Jim Oberstar and researching the book at the Minnesota Historical Society I also mentioned “sleep” a good twenty times. In 2007 and 2008 the word makes few appearances. In the past two years its been mentioned about 20 times per year. That probably represents habit more than anything else. It will be interesting to see how often it turns up in 2012 when the year comes to and end.

Ain’t bookin this

I didn’t pay much attention to the inadvertent jail death of the Duluth man who was found guilty of having sex with underage Grand Marais girls and then shot up the Cook County Court House. It was a big story but for me it was just another headline. Then today I heard this fuller account of a long standing culture of older men hitting up young girls in the County.

It made me stand back on my heels a bit.

One of the stories I don’t plan to write about for my book involves a prominent Minnesota Law enforcement officer. That is the only clue I will offer as the story I was told was based on rumors. If they are true this man, when he was in his twenties and/or thirties, chased young girls from the Grand Portage Indian Reservation. The Rez is also, of course, part of Cook, County. This Minneapolitan would have been introduced to the culture, as were some mentioned in the MPR story, by locals who knew all the good fishing hot spots.

Word Search of the Day

Well, I obviously can’t run for Congress since I was so busy being a grandparent to a sick grandchild over the last week that I simply didn’t find the ten minutes necessary to post my daily word search yesterday.

That responsibility has spread to today as the second grandson seems to have caught was his little brother had last week. I picked him up this morning so we could take care of him rather than risk spreading a virus to his school mates. That leads me to today’s word search overreach.

Word Search of the Day

Mea Culpa

I make my share of mistakes. I don’t worry too much about misspellings, typos, and other pretty constant static in my blog posts. I’ll occasionally find a blooper and quietly correct it. For instance yesterday when I was going through “uncategorized” posts which I had simply forgotten to file in one or more of the topical categories on the right side of the blog I found one that mentioned Der Spiegaj…….Oops. I meant the German publication Der Speigel. I changed the j to an l without remarking on the correction.

When I do make substantive mistakes I take pride in noting them even when it burns a little to admit my human frailty. I just ran into an old post called “I stand corrected” and it made me wonder how often I’d used the phrase. Then I wondered about how many other ways I could locate past apologies for providing misinformation in the past.

Here are a few other trite phrases I’ve used to correct past posts.

I stand corrected

I was wrong

my mistake

Word Search of the Day

scapegoat

As in this accurate DNT Editorial appraisal of the Duluth School Board.

The old boss is gone. He can’t defend himself. Let’s blame him.

Duluth School Board Chairwoman Ann Wasson left little question about her blame after news broke Tuesday that the final pieces of the school district’s Long-Range Facilities Plan had expired and would need to be resubmitted to the state for re-approval. The inexcusable expiration posed a potentially pricey delay in starting construction at Congdon and Myers-Wilkins elementaries, the last two schools to be rebuilt or replaced before the oft-controversial long-range schools plan finally can be put in the past.

“Clearly, (former) Superintendent (I.V.) Foster had chosen to stay away from the long-range plan,” Wasson said Tuesday. “He said, “That’s over. That was (former Superintendent Keith) Dixon’s deal; we’re moving ahead with education.” Some pieces were left behind and forgotten, and that’s what happened.”